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Christian Mohr Family

Christian Mohr (1833-1877)
+ Charlotte Maurer (1835-1905)
Charles H. Mohr (1863-1939)
+ Katie L. Young (1877-1967)
Louisa Hattie Mohr (1909-1995)
+ Elza Garland Dolton (1904-1981)


Photo of Charles and Katie Mohr This is a picture of Charles and Katie Mohr. Charles Mohr (b: 1863) made a run in Oklahoma, but was unable to find land upon which he could file a claim. He then bought a quarter section from a man that was successful in the run for one hundred dollars. Charles Mohr returned to Chicago, but came back with his mother and sister Jenny. They settled in Mustang around 1870. Charles worked as a carpenter helping to build buildings including the churches, then rebuilding after the big tornado damage caused by a storm in April 1927.

In the year 1863 the United States finds itself in the second year of a Civil War that many did not believe would last more than a couple of months. In 1863, Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, making the abolition of slavery in the confederate states an official war goal. That year ground was broken in Sacramento, California, on the construction of the First North American Transcontinental Railroad. First meeting of the "Committee of the Five" in Geneva, Switzerland, this year is regarded as the foundation of the International Committee of the Red Cross. In the Franco-Mexican War in Mexico; the Battle of Camarón took place in April: 65 soldiers of the French Foreign Legion fought 2,000 Mexicans; three of the Legionnaires survived the battle.

It was into this world that Charles Henry Mohr was born on November 8, 1863, in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois. His parents were Christian and Charlotte Mohr who had come to America from Germany as children.

The Charles Mohr family participated in one of the Oklahoma land runs, but was unable to find a good section of land upon which to file a claim. Charles Mohr returned to Chicago, but came back with his mother and sister Jenny when his brother Fred came to fetch them. They settled in Mustang around 1890. Charles worked as a carpenter helping to build buildings including the churches, then rebuilding after the big tornado damage caused by a storm in April 1927.

Charles came courting Katie Young on a working mule from the farm he had bought one mile south of the Young farm. Charles bought a quarter section (160 acres) from a speculator that was successful in the run for one hundred dollars. Charles and Katie were married in 1885.

Their family started with Maude in 1887, Jenny 1889, Lottie 1894, Bessie 1901, Earl 1905, Lawrence 1907, Louisa 1909, Fred 1912, Rose 1914, and Edna in 1916. After they were married, they lived in a two room shanty in the wood lot (or grove) on the North West corner of the farm. Most farmers preserved a grove of trees to supply wood for cooking and heating their homes.

The shanty was shedded onto for living space as the first four girls were born. When Earl was born, they built the two story house where they raised their family. During these early days they got their water out of a well and when they had to go to the bathroom they went to an outhouse. It wasn’t until about 1939 that running water, septic tanks, and electricity came to most of the homes in Mustang.

My grandmother Louisa was close to being the middle child among her eleven brothers and sisters. By 1927, Louisa had worked in her parents fields, worked with her mother preparing meals, and went to Mustang School through the tenth grade. She played high school basketball, and sang in the high school choir but became disenchanted with school because the basketball coach would not let her play on the basketball team so she dropped out of school. Louisa said she quit high school because she wanted to play on the school basketball team and her teacher wouldn’t let her. There was another team in town and they asked her to play. The teacher wanted her to come back to school so she quit. Grandma said the teacher was a real ___. When I asked Louisa if she was any good she said, “Well sure. I was the star forward.”

She turned eighteen the first of June in 1927. She had been dating Elza Dolton, and was working in the fields with her dad on June second. Elza was walking in the field near her father trying to ask him to let them get married.

They had already asked mother Kate, and she had said it was all right with her if they could get dad’s permission. When Elza finally was able to say, I want to marry Louisa, he must have gotten a positive response. The next day, June third, they were married by a judge in the Oklahoma City Courthouse with Louisa’s brother Lawrence Mohr and his wife Carrie in attendance as witnesses.

Read more HERE.


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